Readability Checker

Our Automatic Readability Checker takes a sample of your writing and calculates the number of sentences, words, syllables, and characters in your sample. Our program takes the output of these numbers and plugs them into popular readability formulas. These readability formulas (see below) will let you know the reading level and grade level of your text and help you determine if your audience can read your writing.

Directions: Paste in a sample of text and click "Check Readabilty." A sufficient sample size consists of 4-5 full sentences; approximately 200 - 600 words total. For larger texts, such as books, manuals, or dissertations, pull 1-2 sample sizes from each chapter. (Note: We limit the sample size to 3000 words. Sample sizes over 3K words are truncated.)



How to interpret your results

Our free readability formula tool will analyze your text and output the results based on these readability formulas. Our tool will also help you determine the grade level for your text.


Flesch reading ease

The Flesch–Kincaid readability tests are readability tests designed to indicate how difficult a passage in English is to understand. There are two tests, the Flesch Reading Ease, and the Flesch–Kincaid Grade Level. Although they use the same core measures (word length and sentence length), they have different weighting factors.

Learn more about Flesch-Kincaid

Score School level Notes
100.00-90.00 5th grade Very easy to read. Easily understood by an average 11-year-old student.
90.0–80.0 6th grade Easy to read. Conversational English for consumers.
80.0–70.0 7th grade Fairly easy to read.
70.0–60.0 8th & 9th grade Plain English. Easily understood by 13- to 15-year-old students.
60.0–50.0 10th to 12th grade Fairly difficult to read.
50.0–30.0 College Difficult to read.
30.0–0.0 College graduate Very difficult to read. Best understood by university graduates.

Kincaid grade level

The Flesch–Kincaid readability tests are readability tests designed to indicate how difficult a passage in English is to understand. There are two tests, the Flesch Reading Ease, and the Flesch–Kincaid Grade Level. Although they use the same core measures (word length and sentence length), they have different weighting factors.

Learn more about Flesch-Kincaid

Score Reading level by grade
5 5th grade
6 6th grade
7 7th grade
8 8th grade
9 9th grade
10 10th grade
11 11th grade
12 12th grade
13+ College

Gunning fog index

In linguistics, the Gunning fog index is a readability test for English writing. The index estimates the years of formal education a person needs to understand the text on the first reading. For instance, a fog index of 12 requires the reading level of a United States high school senior (around 18 years old). The test was developed in 1952 by Robert Gunning, an American businessman who had been involved in newspaper and textbook publishing.

Learn more about the Gunning fog index

Fog Index Reading level by grade
17 College graduate
16 College senior
15 College junior
14 College sophomore
13 College freshman
12 High school senior
11 High school junior
10 High school sophomore
9 High school freshman
8 Eighth grade
7 Seventh grade
6 Sixth grade

Automated readability index

The automated readability index (ARI) is a readability test for English texts, designed to gauge the understandability of a text. Like the Flesch–Kincaid grade level, Gunning fog index, SMOG index, Fry readability formula, and Coleman–Liau index, it produces an approximate representation of the US grade level needed to comprehend the text.

Automated readability index

Score Age Grade Level
1 5-6 Kindergarten
2 6-7 First/Second Grade
3 7-9 Third Grade
4 9-10 Fourth Grade
5 10-11 Fifth Grade
6 11-12 Sixth Grade
7 12-13 Seventh Grade
8 13-14 Eighth Grade
9 14-15 Ninth Grade
10 15-16 Tenth Grade
11 16-17 Eleventh Grade
12 17-18 Twelfth grade
13 18-24 College student
14 24+ Professor



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